William Worthy, a Reporter Drawn to Forbidden Datelines, Dies at 92

For half a century journalist William Worthy forged a path in the coverage of global events. Following a distinguished performance in 1955 as a foreign correspondent in the Soviet Union for CBS News and the Baltimore Afro American, Worthy, then a 35-year-old Nieman Fellow at Harvard, slipped into China in 1956–57 to report for 41 days in defiance of a U.S. travel ban. Upon his return home, the State Department denied him a new passport when he refused to promise that he would curtail future travel. Without a passport, Worthy traveled in l961 to forbidden Cuba. After four visits — from which he reported and helped to produce an ABC–TV documentary, "Yanki, No!" — his own government tried and sentenced him to jail. When a federal appeals court unanimously overturned his conviction in l964, ruling travel restrictions to be unconstitutional, Worthy was still journeying — without benefit of passport — throughout Southeast Asia. In 1981, after returning from a CBS assignment in Iran, Worthy and two colleagues won $16,000 in Fourth Amendment damages from the FBI and CIA for confiscating from their baggage at the Boston airport Iranian paperback reprints of classified CIA documents, seized when Iranian students took over the U.S. embassy in Teheran in 1979. Currently, Worthy serves as special assistant to the dean of the School of Communications at Howard University, where he taught between 1990 and 1993 as Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Professor. SOURCE: http://www.bates.edu/alumni-worthy.xml
For half a century journalist William Worthy forged a path in the coverage of global events. Following a distinguished performance in 1955 as a foreign correspondent in the Soviet Union for CBS News and the Baltimore Afro American, Worthy, then a 35-year-old Nieman Fellow at Harvard, slipped into China in 1956–57 to report for 41 days in defiance of a U.S. travel ban. Upon his return home, the State Department denied him a new passport when he refused to promise that he would curtail future travel.
Without a passport, Worthy traveled in l961 to forbidden Cuba. After four visits — from which he reported and helped to produce an ABC–TV documentary, « Yanki, No! » — his own government tried and sentenced him to jail. When a federal appeals court unanimously overturned his conviction in l964, ruling travel restrictions to be unconstitutional, Worthy was still journeying — without benefit of passport — throughout Southeast Asia.
In 1981, after returning from a CBS assignment in Iran, Worthy and two colleagues won $16,000 in Fourth Amendment damages from the FBI and CIA for confiscating from their baggage at the Boston airport Iranian paperback reprints of classified CIA documents, seized when Iranian students took over the U.S. embassy in Teheran in 1979.
Currently, Worthy serves as special assistant to the dean of the School of Communications at Howard University, where he taught between 1990 and 1993 as Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Professor.
SOURCE: http://www.bates.edu/alumni-worthy.xml

 

MYSOURCE: I would like to thank Pierre Laval-Pineault, one of the greatest « Wordly Tourism Guide » I know on this planet!

William Worthy, a Reporter Drawn to Forbidden Datelines, Dies at 92

Mr. Ochs wrote “The Ballad of William Worthy,” which includes these lines:

William Worthy isn’t worthy to enter our door.

Went down to Cuba, he’s not American anymore.

But somehow it is strange to hear the State Department say,

You are living in the free world, in the free world you must stay.

FILE - In a April 16, 1964 file photo, newsman William Worthy, 42, left, and attorney William Kunstler hold an application for new passport and the $10 it cost Worthy to file it at the U.S. passport office, in New York. Worthy, a foreign correspondent who defied travel bans to Cold War adversaries of the United States, died May 4, 2014, in Brewster, Mass., according to the The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. He was 92. (AP Photo/Bob Goldberg, File)
FILE – In a April 16, 1964 file photo, newsman William Worthy, 42, left, and attorney William Kunstler hold an application for new passport and the $10 it cost Worthy to file it at the U.S. passport office, in New York. Worthy, a foreign correspondent who defied travel bans to Cold War adversaries of the United States, died May 4, 2014, in Brewster, Mass., according to the The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. He was 92. (AP Photo/Bob Goldberg, File)

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